George Eliot Review Issue 46: 2015

Description

Issue 46 of the George Eliot Review
Contains:
Silas Marner: George Eliot's Most Coleridgean Work?
Elizabeth Gaskell in Middlemarch: Timothy Cooper, the Judgement of Solomon, and the Woman at the Window
How Much did Dorothea and Celia Know? Sexual Ignorance and Knowledge among Unmarried Girls in Middlemarch
Mr. Brooke's Thinking Organ
Middlemarch and the Franco-Prussian War
Felix Holt: The Radical and the Gusset of Cryptic Futurity
A Life Reclaimed: George Evans (1766-1857) of Norbury, Winster, Derby and Belper
Conference Report, George Eliot Conference, 2014: "Middlemarch"
Review of Middlemarch: Critical Approaches to the Novel edited by Barbara Hardy
Review of George Eliot's Feminism: 'The Right to Rebellion' by June Skye Szirotny
Review of George Eliot, Poetess by Wendy S. Williams
Review of George Eliot and Money: Economics, Ethics and Literature by Dermot Coleman
Review of Sophie and the Sybil: A Victorian Romance by Patricia Duncker
Review of The Dog in the Dickensian Imagination by Beryl Gray
Review of Anna Bentick, Reading of Silas Marner
Note: Alcharisi and the Redundant Definite Article
Front Matter 2015: 46
Address at the Westminster Abbey Wreath Laying, 2014
Annual Report - 2014
Japanese Branch Report 2014
Address at the Westminster Abbey Wreath Laying, 2014

Readers, in my experience, often make an assumption that unmarried girls in nineteenth-century novels know nothing about sex, and this seems to be particularly the case regarding Dorothea Brooke. Had she only known about sex, so the adage goes, she…

No wonder we all felt exhausted by December! In preparing this report I have realized what an extraordinary number of things the Fellowship did last year; certainly the biggest workload since I became chairman but, one hopes, a year which brought new…

In 1861 Henry Crabb Robinson compared George Eliot's Silas Marner with Coleridge's 'The Ancient Mariner'. He noted the novel's 'great affinity' with the poem: 'A little child, its mother having frozen to death at his solitary hovel, is taken in by…